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For Radio Stations - K-State Radio Network - June 14, 2019


(click here for last week's features)

Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu.

Cuesheet: .doc .pdf

 
The mp3 files below are broadcast quality: 44100 Hz 16-bit mono, 128 Kbps CBR (constant bit rate). We strongly recommend that for broadcasting purposes, the files are downloaded to your control room or broadcast computer, and played from that machine. We discourage playing these files directly from the internet, through a web browser or other application.

The 20 cuts below feature a 3-minute fully-produced piece followed by the scripts and bites that comprise that piece, for your own voicing.

 

 

AGRICULTURE TODAY FEATURES

 

1

FLY CONTROL MEASURES  (fully produced)    (Jeff Wichman)

Q…K-State Radio Network.

3:00

 

FLY CONTROL MEASURES (soundbites)

 

Routine monitoring of the herd can give cow-calf producers a jump on controlling flies. Cattle can have their health and comfort impacted by flies, which can transmit bacteria and spread disease. K-State veterinarian Bob Larson says horn flies and face flies are the biggest concern because they’re going to create the most problem for pasture cattle.     

                                                                                                              

                                             Track 2    (:23)    Q…and eating that.

 

According to Larson, the stress and irritation created by horn flies can actually cause cattle to lose weight.

 

                                             Track 3    (:34)    Q...quite a challenge.

 

There is a threshold or general rule-of-thumb for when to begin treatment for horn flies. Larson says the timing is especially important because the temptation is to begin the treatment too soon.

 

                                             Track 4   (:39)    Q...with some fly control.

 

TAG:  That’s K-State veterinarian Bob Larson discussing fly control measures for cow-calf producers. He says controlling face flies is more difficult than horn flies because they don’t spend as much time on the animals. As a result, the best control method is to use insecticides to repel the flies and keep them away from the cattle’s face. Larson also encourages producers to keep records of the products they use, including the date the treatment was applied. If the treatment becomes less effective, it’s probably time to switch to a new treatment option.

 

5

MONITOR THE HEALTH OF BULLS (fully produced)     (Jeff Wichman)

Q…K-State Radio Network.

3:00

 

MONITOR THE HEALTH OF BULLS (soundbites)

 

In addition to performing a pre-breeding soundness examination on bulls to make sure they are sound, fertile and ready-to-go, cattle producers should continue to monitor the health of their bulls for the remainder of the breeding season. K-State veterinarian Bob Larson says a lot of things can go wrong once a bull is in the pasture, including foot and leg issues, sickness from a number of different diseases and injury during the act of mating. Fortunately, most of the problems that can happen after a bull has been turned out to pasture can be seen or observed by the naked eye.               

                                                                                                             

                                             Track 6    (:21)    Q…examination revealed.

 

To kill two birds with stone, Larson recommends cattle producers check the health status of their bulls while they care for the cow herd.

 

                                             Track 7   (:51)    Q...the bull’s not breeding.

 

And, once producers know what to look for, Larson says checking the health of their bulls really doesn’t take a lot of time or extra effort.

 

                                             Track 8   (:15)    Q...doing in the pasture.

 

TAG:  That’s K-State veterinarian Bob Larson with some thoughts on monitoring the health of bulls in the pasture throughout the breeding season. Bob is also a host of the Cattle Chat podcast produced by the Beef Cattle Institute at Kansas State University. A link to the podcast is available online at: ksubci.org.

 

9

SUDDEN OAK DEATH   (fully produced)    (Jeff Wichman)

Q…K-State Radio Network.

3:00 

 

SUDDEN OAK DEATH (soundbites)

 

The Kansas Department of Agriculture announced on June 7th that the pathogen that causes Sudden Oak Death had been found in rhododendron container plants that were part of a shipment from Oklahoma distributed to Walmart stores in Kansas and one Home Depot in Pittsburg. From Kansas State University, this is Agriculture Today. I’m Jeff Wichman. Kansas oak forests are located primarily in the eastern third of the state. Health and conservation forester with the Kansas Forest Service, Ryan Amrbrust, (arm-broost) says this pathogen threatens oak trees and a variety of plants.                 

                                                                                                             

                                             Track 10    (:37)    Q…never been before.

 

The good news, according to Armbrust, is that a disease triangle is currently not present.

 

                                             Track 11   (:42)    Q...to our red oaks.

 

If you bought a rhododendron container plant this spring – any time after April – at any Kansas Walmart or the Home Depot in Pittsburg, Armbrust says it needs to be removed from the home landscape immediately.

 

                                             Track 12   (:40)    Q...to lose them.

 

TAG:  That’s Ryan Armbrust, the health and conservation forester with the Kansas Forest Service. If you have questions about Sudden Oak Death, contact your local county or district Extension office.

 

13

ADDING LATE-SEASON NITROGEN  (fully produced)   (Jeff Wichman)

Q…K-State Radio Network.

 

3:00

 

ADDING LATE-SEASON NITROGEN (soundbites)

 

Although there have been some rainy days, conditions are improving and fields are starting to dry out. This is opening the window for corn producers to consider a late-season fertilizer application to replace nitrogen that may have been lost due to the excessive rains earlier this spring. From Kansas State University, this is Agriculture Today. I’m Jeff Wichman. K-State crop nutrient specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz (Door-eh-var Roo-ez Dee-az) says producers need to think about the different types of nutrients and the value of that nutrient for in-season application.             

                                                                                                             

                                             Track 14    (:26)    Q…fertilizer application.

 

Kansas State University has three years of studies looking at the timing of side dressing applications and Ruiz-Diaz says this includes some very late applications – all the way to tassel for corn.

 

                                             Track 15   (:40)    Q...are short of nitrogen.

 

Because it may be difficult to determine just how much nitrogen has been lost, Ruiz-Diaz suggests producers monitor their fields closely rather than putting nitrogen down too quickly.

 

                                             Track 16   (:42)    Q...a little bit careful.

 

TAG: That’s K-State crop nutrient specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz with thoughts on late-season nitrogen applications.

 

17

CORN ESTIMATES SLASHED   (fully produced)        (Jeff Wichman)

Q…K-State Radio Network.

3:00

 

CORN ESTIMATES SLASHED (soundbites)

 

In their June World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimates report, USDA slashed corn output, but left soybeans unchanged. From Kansas State University, this is Agriculture Today. I’m Jeff Wichman. K-State grain market economist Dan O’Brien says USDA adjusted its projections of the size of the 2019 crop and took its first stab at how declining production prospects for the corn crop in the U.S. could affect prices and supply and demand numbers.            

                                                                                                              

                                             Track 18    (:42)    Q…or thereabouts.

 

O’Brien says the latest corn projection by USDA is raising some red flags.

 

                                             Track 19   (:39)    Q...new crop marketing year.

 

O’Brien also says what is seen in corn has an impact on other feed grains – and the first feed grain in Kansas we’d look to would be grain sorghum.

 

                                             Track 20   (:39)    Q...corn market, this year.

 

TAG: That’s K-State grain market economist Dan O’Brien with reaction to USDA’s June World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimates report. You can find his full analysis online at: agmanager.info.

 

 

The 5 features below are sound bites only

 

 

FAMILY AND CONSUMER

 

21

FOOD SAFETY FOR OLDER ADULTS According to the Food and Drug Administration, a lot has changed in the way food is produced and distributed. Today, food comes from all over the world and nearly 50% of the money spent on food goes to buy food that others prepared – like “take out” and fast food. Another thing that’s changed is our awareness and knowledge of illnesses that can be caused by harmful bacteria in food. We know that some people, including those 65 and older, are more susceptible to getting sick from bacteria in food. K-State Research and Extension food scientist Karen Blakeslee says part of the reason for that is that our bodies change as we age.

Q...in your food.

 

:23

22

HOW CAN YOU REDUCE THE RISK? There are a number of steps older adults can take to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Besides washing hands and surfaces often, avoiding cross-contamination, cooking food to a safe internal temperature and refrigerating leftovers promptly, Blakeslee says other recommendations for older adults focus on simplifying the food-making process.

Q...box of crackers.

 

:52

 

23

THREE TEMPERATURES TO KNOWCooking food – especially raw meat, poultry, fish and eggs – to a safe minimum internal temperature kills harmful bacteria. Several types of thermometers are available and most only take a few seconds to accurately display the temperature. To make it even easier, Blakeslee says we only have to remember three temperatures.

Q...is not there.

Tag: Blakeslee says leftovers from a restaurant should not sit in the car for several hours, they should be put in the refrigerator as soon as possible. Leftovers should be eaten within two or three days or frozen for later use.

 

:26

24

IS YOUR MEAL MICROWAVE SAFE?If you purchase pre-packaged frozen meals from the grocery store, Blakeslee says to pay attention to whether they can be microwaved – otherwise be prepared to use a regular oven.

Q...ready to eat. 

 

:30

25

WHEN IN DOUBT, THROW IT OUT!While there is an emphasis to avoid food waste, there are times when that’s the best choice – and Blakeslee says the food doesn’t have to go to waste.

Q...look so good.

Tag: Another reason to not take a chance on questionable food is that It can be difficult to tell if food is unsafe because you can’t see, smell or taste the bacteria it may contain. There is also a wide range of time between eating food with harmful bacteria and the onset of illness. Usually foodborne bacteria take one to three days to cause illness. But you could become sick anytime from 20 minutes to six weeks after eating some foods with dangerous bacteria. It depends on a variety of factors, including the type of bacteria in the food. 

 

:36

 

The features below are self-contained and fully-produced

 

 

KANSAS PROFILE

 

26

STEPHANIE AND DOUG DAVIDBOW CREEK RANCHKansas is known for being one of the leading beef cattle states, but one entrepreneur is looking to break into the market with a more exotic bovine. Ron Wilson, director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development, takes us to a ranch where some of the livestock have family roots on the other side of the world.

Q...with Kansas Profile.

4:12

 

MILK LINES

 

27

SUMMER HEAT ABATEMENTDespite a relatively cool spring, summer heat will soon be kicking in. With that in mind, now is a good time for dairy producers to begin checking their heat abatement systems so cows will be cool this summer. In addition to inspecting and repairing feedline soaking systems, controllers and pipes, K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) says cooling fans should be cleaned and positioned to deliver air down to the cows.

Q...(theme music)

2:00

 

OUTBOUND KANSAS

 

 

28

MANAGING POND FISHOnce a farm pond manager has taken inventory of the fish in a given pond, as was outlined on last week’s program, the next step is to strategically harvest fish from the pond to promote high-quality long-term fishing.  The approach will depend on one’s objective, as explained this week by K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee.  He talks about three common management options and how to carry them out.

Q...(theme music)

5:00

 

PLANTORAMA

 

 

29

INSECT PEST PROTECTIONThe abundant moisture this spring has created a thriving environment for a variety of insect pests. K-State horticultural entomologist Raymond Cloyd offers advice on protecting ourselves from ticks, mosquitoes and chiggers. He also explains how to best detect and control slugs.

Q...(theme music)

5:00

 

SOUND LIVING

 

30

FOOD SAFETY FOR OLDER ADULTS According to the Food and Drug Administration, a lot has changed in the way food is produced and distributed. Today, food comes from all over the world and nearly 50% of the money spent on food goes to buy food that others prepared – like “take out” and fast food. Another thing that’s changed is our awareness and knowledge of illnesses that can be caused by harmful bacteria in food. We know that some people, including those 65 and older, are more susceptible to getting sick from bacteria in food. K-State Research and Extension food scientist Karen Blakeslee says seniors who handle food safely can help keep themselves healthy. On today’s Sound Living: food safety for older adults.

Q...K-State Radio Network.

14:50

 

TREE TALES from the Kansas Forest Service

cut 32 contains music; cut 33 does not

 

31

SUMMER TREE PRUNING TIPSMany older shade trees in the home landscape benefit from an early summer pruning. K-State forester Charles Barden says a light pruning helps reduce crown size, slows tree growth, keeps troublesome branches away from the roof and makes the lawn easier to mow.

Q…(theme music)

2:00

32

(same as above, but without music bed)

Q...K-State Radio Network.

2:00

 

WEATHER WONDERS with Mary Knapp, Weather Data Library, KSU

 

33

HEAT BURST You’ve probably heard of a cloudburst, a torrential downpour of rain – but how about a heat burst? Kansas State University climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) explains.

Q...Research and Extension.

:54

34

DRY LIGHTNINGImagine a thunderstorm in which the raindrops evaporate on their way down. Kansas State University climatologist Mary Knapp says you don’t have to imagine it – it’s a real weather phenomenon.

Q...Research and Extension.

:53

35

SUMMER SOLSTICEToday may not be the hottest day of the year, but it will be our longest. Kansas State University climatologist Mary Knapp has more.

Q...Research and Extension.

:52

 

WHEAT SCOOP from the Kansas Wheat Commission

 

36

FESTIVAL OF BREADS WINNERSWinners in this year’s 2019 National Festival of Breads baking competition have been crowned. Marsha Boswell takes a look at the winners – and their winning entries.

Q... I’m Marsha Boswell.

3:00

 

 

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